Top Tips To Facilitate Rockwell Hardness Tests

hardness test

Hardness is defined as the measure of resistance that a material has when force is applied to it. Others may refer to hardness as the ability of a substance to resist scratching, cutting or abrasions. There is a direct relationship between the level of hardness of an object and the level of its resistance. The greater the hardness, the greater the resistance. Hardness is largely determined by a substance’s microstructure. Hardness matters because it gives us an indication of how the material will stand up against pressure. This has implications on how the material can be used and what kind of pressure it can withstand. For this reason, measuring hardness is a routine procedure in most quality control processes. Here are some of the ways of facilitating Rockwell hardness tests.

Check Indenter

Before carrying out a Rockwell hardness test, it is critical to ensure that there is no chipped or cracked diamonds on the indenter. This is because any of such anomalies are likely to lead to errors in the readings. Experts recommend checking the indenter every week with a magnifying device (such as a Jeweler’s eye loop). However, it might be hard to tell if the indenter is damaged. For this reason, if you notice consistent erroneous readings, this might be another clue that there is a problem with the indenter.

Verify Hardness Readings

Before performing a test, experts recommend that you test the hardness of a test block. This is a block with a hardness that is already known and thus the idea is to check if the reading from the tool is consistent with the known hardness. It is usually standard to do at least three tests in order to establish a consistent reading. It is also standard to discard the first reading after an indenter or an anvil change.

Keep the Rockwell Hardness Tester Clean

Debris, dirt and other contaminants can affect readings. It is important to remove and clean the indenter and anvil before you start testing. It is also critical to do this at every break between the shifts so that all parts of the tester stay clean throughout the day.

 Smoothen Surfaces

When testing objects that are rough or that have textured surfaces, it is important to be aware that these kinds of surfaces can affect the readings obtained from the tester. To help overcome these kinds of problems, ensure that you lightly sand the surface to reduce the roughness.

Watch out For Movement

If you get any movement of the part while doing a test, you should discard the reading and perform another test. You should also avoid including these readings in your final average. This is because the movement of the part can affect the accuracy of the test.

Watch out for the Edge

When you take readings very close to the edge, it might cause problems with the reading and might even damage the indenter. Ensure that all readings are made at least 2.5 times the diameter of the indenter from the edge. The key to note is that if the metal buckles outward, then you have positioned the indenter too close to the edge.

Product Spotlight: Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage

height gage

Height gages have been in use for many decades to measure heights of objects. Height gage can also be used to measure a variety of other parameters. These include diameters, radii, and more. Over the years, height gages have evolved and today, we have digital height gages where a lot of the processes are automated. This makes it easier for machinists to use height gages.

One such height gage is the Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage. This is an easy-to-use height gage that comes with a modern touch screen. It comes with a lateral insert holder that makes it great for use in a workshop. In order to improve clarity, the touch screen is very simplified so that the machine operator will not get distracted by clutter. In continuance with the drive to simplify things, the number of buttons is limited to only what is absolutely necessary.

The advantage of this is that operating the machine becomes very simple so one can easily perform complex operations simultaneously. The other advantage is that not a lot of training is required to get new workers to operate the machine. This saves a lot of time and costs, ensuring that productivity is always at its maximum.

About Fowler High Precision

Fowler High Precision Company is widely recognized as one of the leading manufacturers of precision equipment in the world. The company was founded in 1946 and since then, it has grown to where it is today. Fowler High Precision has managed to remain dynamic thanks to strategic partnerships with other companies such as Wyler and Trimos among others. This way, Fowler has ensured that they remain at the peak of the technology curve. This is reflected in the state-of-the-art products that the company supplies such as the Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage.

Features of Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage

Here’s a quick look at some notable features of Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage:

  • 2D programming, statistics
  • Large range of accessories
  • Measuring ranges 400 to 1800mm
  • Manual or motorized displacement
  • All possible adjustments without tools
  • Interfaces RS232 and USB
  • Simple and easy-to-use graphic interface
  • Electronically adjustable measuring force

 Get Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage from Willrich Precision!

Willrich Precision is your go-to supplier of top-quality precision instruments such as the Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage. We have been serving numerous customers for over 50 years and we have established a reputation as a trusted business partner. Our unique business model focuses on providing solutions to our clients. This is why we go out of our way to offer advice and assistance to clients who are not sure what instruments work best for their needs. 

When you come to Willrich Precision, you can have peace of mind that you are getting top quality precision instruments at very competitive prices.

To know more about our Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gages and the benefits they provide, do not hesitate to contact us today.

Product Spotlight: Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage

Height gages have
been in use for many decades to measure heights of objects. Height gage can
also be used to measure a variety of other parameters. These include diameters,
radii, and more. Over the years, height gages have evolved and today, we have
digital height gages where a lot of the processes are automated. This makes it
easier for machinists to use height gages.

One such height gage is the Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage.
This is an easy-to-use height gage that comes with
a modern touch screen. It comes with a lateral insert holder that makes it
great for use in a workshop. In order to improve clarity, the touch screen is
very simplified so that the machine operator will not get distracted by
clutter. In continuance with the drive to simplify things, the number of
buttons is limited to only what is absolutely necessary.

The advantage of
this is that operating the machine becomes very simple so one can easily
perform complex operations simultaneously. The other advantage is that not a
lot of training is required to get new workers to operate the machine. This
saves a lot of time and costs, ensuring that productivity is always at its
maximum.

About Fowler High Precision

Fowler High
Precision Company is widely recognized as one of the leading manufacturers of precision
equipment in the world. The company was founded in 1946 and since then, it has
grown to where it is today. Fowler High Precision has managed to remain dynamic
thanks to strategic partnerships with other companies such as Wyler and Trimos
among others. This way, Fowler has ensured that they remain at the peak of the
technology curve. This is reflected in the state-of-the-art products that the
company supplies such as the Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage.

Features of Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage

Here’s a quick look
at some notable features of Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic
2D Height Gage:

  • 2D programming,
    statistics
  • Large range of
    accessories
  • Measuring ranges 400
    to 1800mm
  • Manual or motorized
    displacement
  • All possible
    adjustments without tools
  • Interfaces RS232 and
    USB
  • Simple and
    easy-to-use graphic interface
  • Electronically
    adjustable measuring force

 Get Fowler
Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage from Willrich Precision!

Willrich Precision
is your go-to supplier of top-quality precision instruments such as the Fowler
Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gage. We have been serving numerous customers
for over 50 years and we have established a reputation as a trusted business
partner. Our unique business model focuses on providing solutions to our
clients. This is why we go out of our way to offer advice and assistance to
clients who are not sure what instruments work best for their needs.

When you come to Willrich Precision, you can have peace of mind that you are getting
top quality precision instruments at very competitive prices.

To know more about
our Fowler Trimos V7 Electronic 2D Height Gages and the benefits they provide,
do not hesitate to contact us today.

Top Tips To Facilitate Rockwell Hardness Tests

Hardness is defined as the measure of
resistance that a material has when force is applied to it. Others may refer to
hardness as the ability of a substance to resist scratching, cutting or
abrasions. There is a direct relationship between the level of hardness of an
object and the level of its resistance. The greater the hardness, the greater
the resistance. Hardness is largely determined by a substance’s microstructure.
Hardness matters because it gives us an indication of how the material will
stand up against pressure. This has implications on how the material can be
used and what kind of pressure it can withstand. For this reason, measuring
hardness is a routine procedure in most quality control processes. Here are
some of the ways of facilitating Rockwell
hardness tests
.

Check Indenter

Before carrying out a Rockwell hardness test,
it is critical to ensure that there is no chipped or cracked diamonds on the indenter.
This is because any of such anomalies are likely to lead to errors in the
readings. Experts recommend checking the indenter every week with a magnifying
device (such as a Jeweler’s eye loop). However, it might be hard to tell if the
indenter is damaged. For this reason, if you notice consistent erroneous
readings, this might be another clue that there is a problem with the indenter.

Verify Hardness Readings

Before performing a test, experts recommend
that you test the hardness of a test block. This is a block with a hardness
that is already known and thus the idea is to check if the reading from the
tool is consistent with the known hardness. It is usually standard to do at
least three tests in order to establish a consistent reading. It is also
standard to discard the first reading after an indenter or an anvil change.

Keep the Rockwell Hardness Tester Clean

Debris, dirt and other contaminants can affect
readings. It is important to remove and clean the indenter and anvil before you
start testing. It is also critical to do this at every break between the shifts
so that all parts of the tester stay clean throughout the day.

 Smoothen
Surfaces

When testing objects that are rough or that
have textured surfaces, it is important to be aware that these kinds of
surfaces can affect the readings obtained from the tester. To help overcome
these kinds of problems, ensure that you lightly sand the surface to reduce the
roughness.

Watch out For Movement

If you get any movement of the part while
doing a test, you should discard the reading and perform another test. You
should also avoid including these readings in your final average. This is
because the movement of the part can affect the accuracy of the test.

Watch out for the Edge

When you take readings very close to the edge,
it might cause problems with the reading and might even damage the indenter.
Ensure that all readings are made at least 2.5 times the diameter of the
indenter from the edge. The key to note is that if the metal buckles outward,
then you have positioned the indenter too close to the edge.

Understanding Ra Values for Product Development

Ra values

Surface roughness is also known as Ra, but not many people understand what Ra values implies, how it is measured, and why it is critical to product design. Here is what you need to know about Ra values.

Understanding Ra Values

If you take a sample of a part and measure the high and low points of its length, Ra is the mean or average height that lies above or below the line of reference. The higher the Ra number, the rougher a surface is. If Ra is 0, the graph will show a horizontal line, which means the surface is flat. This is impossible.

Other measurement systems operate on the same principle but are not precisely similar. This can cause errors and confusion, so it is essential to know which method you are referring to and to ensure it is identical to that of your part manufacturer. Always ask if you are not sure as conversion charts are available for system-to-system translation if required.

How the Ra Value Concerns You

The Rvalue is the industry standard for giving instructions to a manufacturer on what the roughness level should and should not be for you. This is used for tooling, machined parts and prototypes. It also affects the part’s appearance, functionality as well as its performance.

Ra shows the average mean deviation or the highest high or low, calculated over the sample’s length. There are many ways to achieve the same mean by using various manufacturing processes. All of which will leave a distinctive pattern on the surface. Manufacturers utilize gages to measure and make comparisons on how different machining methods produce differing types of textures.

The patterns on the gauge surfaces differ in the groove spacing, also known as waves. It is one of the factors that determine surface texture. The waves found on the left are of a low frequency, and the frequency increases from left to right. The R, average height, may be similar but the appearance is not.

How Surface Texture is Measured

Surface texture can be measured with different methods, depending on the part geometry, material type, and part feature. A common technique is to use a stylus or probe, also called a surfometer. It is slowly drawn over the part’s face or feature. Any deviation from a reference line is recorded as a gap to be interpreted later.

The Ra value is calculated with ease via such a reading. It may be more desirable to look at the surface area from a broader view to check for more defects on the surface. This can be done via optical photometry.

One primary utilization of optical photometry to identify asperities. These may be scratches, contaminants in the raw material or voids. Mathematically obtained models tend to consider these irregularities as non-important, but for essential applications in defense, scientific and aerospace instruments, an anomaly would be disastrous.

It takes a combination of both machine and human intelligence for the right decision on surface texture to be made.

Product Spotlight: Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized Height Gage

Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized Height Gage

Height gages are versatile and useful equipment that allow machine operators to measure the height of any part or object. Height gages have other applications as well. For example, Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized Height Gage allows you to easily measure the diameter and radius of a part. Height gages have evolved over the years and the modern digital ones have a lot more to offer and are easy to use. 

A good example of such a gage is the Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized height gage. This easy-to-use gage features an interactive LC display and allows the user to toggle between motorized and manual operation. This amazing instrument from Brown & Sharpe also has a built-in air cushion and can be programmed to automatically run measurements for its most routine and common functions. This saves the operator valuable time as it eliminates the need for constant set-up.

About Brown & Sharpe

Brown & Sharpe is a well-known manufacturer of metrological tools and has been in operation since 1893. The company is now part of the Hexagon AB Group, a Swedish company that acquired Brown & Sharpe in 2001. For most of the 19th and 20th centuries, Brown & Sharpe was regarded as the leading producer of instruments for machinists. Brown & Sharpe has been setting standards for the industry for many years and all its instruments are ranked among the best. This includes the Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized height gage which comes with a host of advanced features which we will talk about below.

Features of Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized Height Gage

Here is a quick look at some of the top features of the Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized Height Gage:

  • Adjustable hybrid multi-user panel 
  • 2D-measurement due to clear graphic visualization
  • Context-based help – intelligent user follow-up
  • Adjustable Panel
  • Standard and advanced 1D& 2D measuring
  • Motorized Height Gage
  • Fast measurements thanks to one-of-a-kind rotary measuring control
  • The choice between 2 intuitive control panels
  • Coefficient of linear expansion comparable to that of steel

Get Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized Height Gage from Willrich Precision!

At Willrich, you can be sure that we will supply you with the best in height gages including the Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized height gage. We have nearly 5 decades of experience and have many happy customers who rely on us for all their precision instrument needs. Our staff members are happy to share with you any information you may require regarding our products and will even help you select the right instrument for your needs. You can call, email or use the chat function on our website to talk to any of our experts.If you wish to know more about Brown & Sharpe TESA MICRO-HITE +M Motorized height gage, do not hesitate to talk to a Willrich specialist today!

Do You Need Coordinate Measuring Machines Or Vision Systems?

coordinate measuring machines

Oftentimes, you get confused about which measurement system can best be applied in an in-house lab. The answer is usually either a Vision System or a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM). The CMM style probing has grown in popularity in use for vision systems. This makes choosing which system to apply in your business less straightforward. The following post aims to explain some important factors that need to be considered in order to make your decision of which measuring equipment to use simpler. Some of the important factors to consider when deciding on coordinate measuring machines or vision systems include:

Size 

Always have the size of your smallest feature in mind when choosing an inspection system. Vision systems are more accurate when dealing with smaller features of about 3-5mm. As for larger features, you need not worry about them since both coordinate measuring machines and Vision Systems can be used to handle them.

Variety 

One of the key considerations to keep in mind when choosing a measuring system is the nature of the characteristics to be measured. You can equip your Vision systems with full probing, to make it a CMM for rapid coordinate metrology. By integrating the CMM with the Vision systems, a high speed, highly automated, 3D coordinate acquisition system can be developed. Its potential applications can be used in a broad spectrum of manufacturing problems with a big impact on inspection and metrology. 

Speed 

Vision Systems are less dependent on probe approach speeds and moving probes. This gives them the potential to move faster, 5-10 times faster than other measurement systems. 

Number 

For the longest time, Vision systems have been used in 2D measurements. The ability to use CMM and vision probing on the same machine as well as interchangeably makes Vision systems the go-to measurement system in most 2½-Dand 3D applications. Vision systems and the part 2D in nature, are the preferred choice of measurement system in the event that the main datums are visible on one view of your print. 

From the above, it is safe to say that choosing which measurement system to use is not as black and white as some would think. A lot of key factors need to be put into consideration when deciding on which system to go for. 

At Willrich Precision Instrument, our staff is ready to guide you in determining which system best suits your needs. We are ISO certified and have been in business for over 40 years, offering solutions pertaining to gaging, inspection and metrology. We work diligently to maintain customer satisfaction by providing expert assistance through our knowledgeable staff. 

If you would like to discover more about our products and the services we offer, feel free to contact us today. 

Top Tips To Choose A Film Thickness Gage

thickness gage performance

A film thickness gage is one of the most essential instruments used in the coatings industry today. Errors in film thickness estimates lead to a significant waste of money, material and time. If a coating application makes a dry film excessively thick, this leads to failures such as flaking, cracking or excessive drying time. In the event that a film is excessively thin, its protective capabilities and hiding power become inadequate and time is lost by having to recoat the entire surface. 

For these reasons, it is important you know how to properly select a film thickness gage. Below are some key factors you can consider when choosing a film thickness gage:

Film Thickness Gage Performance

When choosing this type of thickness gage, always keep in mind its level of performance. A good question to ask yourself is how precise or accurate you need it to be. A high performance gage is needed if you are applying less than 1.0 mil of dry paint film. If you want to further improve your accuracy, choose one which has single or a two point calibration feature. Remember, the gage can be calibrated in line with certified film thickness standards. 

Substrate 

Always consider the substrate the coating is being applied to when choosing a thickness gage. Is the substrate metal or non-metal? If it is metallic, the metal is either ferrous, such as steel, or non-ferrous, such as aluminum. It is worth noting that ferrous metals have magnetic properties, unlike their counterparts, the non-ferrous metals. 

ISO Compliance 

You might be required to document your measurements for ISO compliance. In this case, a film thickness gage with computer interface capabilities and memory is your best choice.

Measurement Area

Another important factor to consider when choosing a film thickness gage is the measurement area location. You will need an exterior probe sensor when measuring inside corners, pipes, and very small surfaces. Unfortunately, when external probe sensors come into play, the choice of film thickness gage models becomes quite limited. 

Certified Thickness Standards

It is recommended you get a certified thickness standard to check if the gage is performing as required. 

Bottom Line

Before choosing a film thickness gage, there are some important factors you should have in mind. For effective coating to take place, you need a well measured film thickness gage. 

Willrich Precision Instrument offers a wide range of film thickness gages that can meet all your gaging and inspection needs. We are an ISO certified company and have been the premier provider of precision measurement systems for over four decades. Our staff is knowledgeable and ready to help you with any questions you may have regarding your metrology needs. Feel free to contact us to discover more about the products and services we offer.

What You Need To Know About Thread Inspection

thread inspection

Thread inspection is described as a ridge of uniform sections in the form of a helix on the external or internal cylinder surface. External threads are found on studs, screws, or bolts, while internal threads are located on tapped holes and nuts.

A large number of machine parts that are fastened to each other are attached via threading. Accurately produced threads are critical for each thread to bear the load evenly. If the male or female threads have a manufacturing flaw, the load distribution will be uneven, meaning some threads will bear more weight than they should. This can be quite disastrous, thus the importance of thread inspection.

Thread Inspection Basics

If you join two parts via threading, the two types of threads are male and female, with the male screwing into the female. As mentioned above, the two types of threads are internal and external. In a nut and bolt example, the bolt is the male and the nut is the female. The nut has threads on the inside, meaning it is an internal thread, and the bolt has threads on the outside, which makes it an external thread.

For the nut and bolt to fit each other, they have to be machined to the same size. The external thread diameter must match the internal thread’s smallest diameter, the pitch of the thread must match, the thread quantity per given length must match, and much more. 

The geometrical measurements needed to inspect a threaded component would be very labor and time-intensive and thus impractical. The solution to this is thread gaging.

Thread Gaging

Thread gaging is the process of inspecting threads, and there are two types of thread gauging:

  • Thread Plugs: Thread pugs are plugs that have external threading, and they are used to measure internally threaded parts such as nuts.
  • Thread Rings: Thread rings are the opposite of thread plugs. They are rings with internal threads and are used for measuring externally threaded parts such as bolts.

Thread plugs and rings are made from old gage steel, which is exceptionally resistant to wear.

Basics of Thread Gaging 

All threads are considered as attribute gages, which mean they do not give any feedback on the exact dimensions. This differs from the measurements you would get from a caliper, which provides you with the precise measurements of whatever you are measuring. 

Thread gages have what we call a Go/No-Go measurement. A threaded plug best explains an example of this measurement. For inspection of the internal thread, the ends of the plug are inserted into the threaded part. The plug’s Go-end should thread in, while the No-Go end should not. If the Go/No-Go test works, the component passes the inspection. If the Go-end part does not fit, then the threaded portion is too small, and vice versa. If the No-Go end fits, then the threaded part is too large.

A thread ring works based on the reversed version of a similar principle. The rings come in a set, and the Go ring is machined to a size smaller than the nominal while the No-Go ring is manufactured to be a little bigger than the nominal. In short, the Go ring is supposed to thread into the machined part while the No-Go ring is not supposed to do so. The Go/No-Go method of measurement is swift and very accurate.

Which Indicating Bore Gage Should You Get?

Which Indicating Bore Gage Should You Get?

If one selects the wrong type of bore gage, it
could deliver inaccurate data, low throughput and end up as an unnecessary
expense. If you are looking to get indicating bore gages, here’s what you need
to know:

Understanding the Basics of Indicating Bore
Gages

The two basic types of indicating bore
gages
are fixed-size gages with plug-style housing and adjustable-capacity
gages with interchangeable extensions or contacts. In most cases, indicating
plug gages offer higher repeatability and can measure closer tolerances than
their adjustable counterparts. Now that you have a better understanding of
indicating bore gages, below are several factors to consider before choosing
the ideal bore gage for your precision measurement needs.

Diameters

If you need to measure large inner
diameters
(ID), adjustable bore gages are currently recognized as the economical
option. Stock adjustable gages and masters are typically available in
capacities of up to 24 inches. Most plug-type gages, on the other hand, are
over 4.5 inches and are considered “specials.” This means that they
cost slightly more than adjustable gages.

Tolerances

Today, many modern shops still utilize adjustable
bore gages. In addition to low production runs, adjustable bore gages come in
handy when technicians need to measure with medium to broad tolerances. Additionally,
the application might have many different bore sizes to measure as well. The
range of these gages is typically up to three times greater than that of plug
gages, i.e. 0.010 inch vs. ≤ 0.006 inch. That’s why they are practical to use
with broader tolerances.

Because adjustable gages can measure a range
of hole sizes, some shops only require just three units, with capacities of:

  • 0.500 to 1.00 inch
  • 1 to 2 inches
  • 2 to 8 inches

Indicating plug gages, on the other hand, require
separate size plugs to measure each hole size.

Stability

One of the biggest advantages of fixed-size
plug gages is that they can eliminate “rocking” to center the gage in
the bore. Self-centering plug gages virtually eliminate operators’ influences
and require minimal training. Rocking adjustable gages is considered a refined
skill that needs to be performed conscientiously. Inadequately trained
operators who are rushed or tired are likely to produce inaccurate results.

Adjustable gages, on the other hand, are more
subject to intentional operator influences than the aforementioned gage. This
is called “close-enough syndrome.” If you want to eliminate
“rocking” and speed up the measurement process, choose plug gages.
They perform well in production runs where tolerances are tight, and volumes
are high. Additionally, they have larger bearing surfaces, are more resistant
to wear, and offer greater repeatability. It is recommended that one uses plug
gages with electronic data collection systems.

Willrich Precision is
the leading supplier of precision instruments including bore gages. We have
over four decades of experience supplying high-quality precision measurement
instruments to a variety of industries. You can count on our professional staff
to offer advice and suggestions when you are buying equipment from us. This
way, you get the correct products for your applications and save money.
Willrich Precision is also a family-owned business and we put our customers at
the center of everything we do.